Differences between fast and gourmet, nutritious and empty

With regard to food, you can get fast and convenient foods versus gourmet meals that take careful and timely preparation. You can also eat nutritious ingredients compared to things with empty calories. Then there’s the realm of things that are simply unhealthy for you.

All of these qualities can be quite independent of cost. More important, these analogies can be applied to other aspects of life.

Is your physical fitness narrowly focused, just treading water, and injurious in the long run, or are you engaged in progressive exercises, honing specific skills and abilities, and moderating your efforts to not compromise your future?

Are your relationships convenient, nutritious, or toxic? Or do you have deep acceptance and respect, attentive and compassionate, people that are nurturing and encouraging?

What about your sex life? Are you simply having the equivalence of fast food?

These are personal choices, certainly. My hope for you is that they are conscious choices, and that you’re fully aware of the potential ramifications.

If not for Enlightenment, then for a marshmallow?

Is competing against monkeys inspiring to you? Perhaps you’ve said to yourself, “if a monkey can do it, then I can!” Well, here’s something to step up to.

According to Philippens and Vanwersch (link), in their studies to test “neurofeedback and other brain-training treatments for epilepsy or ADHD”, they were able to coax monkeys to deliberately replicate the brain activity of meditation, resulting in the monkeys looking “restful [with] focus.”

“The monkeys may not realise that they are changing their brain activity, but it does show that they can consciously change their mood or state of mind,” says Philippens, and the monkeys were rewarded marshmallows for this behavior.

So, my question to you is: do you really believe that attaining a meditative state is difficult for you? I’d be happy to send marshmallows to you if that’d help inspire you. Or, perhaps you could gain results by staring at this monkey…

In all seriousness, the point of this post is that there are some things we can choose to do for ourselves, and some we can’t. A recent dialog on Facebook brought up the fact that, with the exception of people with untreated mental illnesses or mood disorders, attitudes are chosen; they are not involuntary, imposed on us by some other will besides our own. We can choose to be optimistic fearful, or ambivalent.

We can also choose our behavior, and there are countless benefits to slowing down our thinking, to becoming more aware and present; key benefits from building a practice of meditation.

You can always “act as if”. Like the old saying goes, “monkey see, monkey do.”